periferic


The Foundation for P2P Alternatives by peterfuchs
October 3, 2008, 7:49 pm
Filed under: Art as Gift Research blog | Tags:

I have stumbled upon this website – The Foundation for P2P Alternatives – during my research, maybe it might add something to the issue of gift-economy and peer-to-peer based exchange of intellectual properties.

The articles The Peer To Peer Manifesto: The Emergence of P2P Civilization and Political Economy and the P2P Economic Potential As An Alternative Production Approach are both interesting articles by Michel Bauwens, who is the co creator of the documentary movie Technocalyps, which I also recommend to watch if you manage to get a copy (torrent?).



The free culture game – by Molleindustria by peterfuchs
September 25, 2008, 6:22 am
Filed under: Art as Gift Research blog | Tags: , ,
Free Culture Game

Free Culture Game

Free Culture Game offers a ludic metaphor for the battle between copyright encroachments and the free exchange of knowledge, ideas and art. A circular field represents The Common, where knowledge can be freely shared and created; your job is to maintain a healthy ecology of yellow idea-bubbles bouncing from person to person before they can be sucked into the dark outer ring representing the forces of The Market. (via Rhizome.org)

Molleindustria, the radical game developer group did a “playable theory” work, which like many of their other games, may be played for an infinite, (update:actually this might be won, yet I never could). This near infinity of the “theory” has its purpose, as the battle for free knowledge and the market has a long history, and will have a future indeed, I am sure. The “theory” is quite straightforward, and one might say, and rather pessimistic, as there is no escape from the diabolical circle of market-free economy of knowledge. Anyway, can’t say it better, then this software application does.

If you have not met with the groups works, check out their website for their art pieces like the McDonalds Videogame.



Hacker culture, intellectual properties and the Gift Economy / part 1 by peterfuchs
September 21, 2008, 7:11 pm
Filed under: Art as Gift Research blog | Tags:
Razor1911 warez group logo

Razor1911 warez group logo

We  are  the  result  of  your  laws.
We are the result of your  democracy.
We are the result of your corruption. (PROCYON group announcement)

One of the most important aspect of hacker culture is the donation of the stolen (hacked) product to the public, turning the result of the heist into a free, shared public commodity. In theory, the activity of the hacker aims to free up the intellectual products which are held back from the public by its ruthless, profit seeking publishers. The hacker mythology was always very aware to the general rules of gift economy, and as it become widespread with the generational change of the last few years, the generation, of which elite are mostly made up of ex-hackers are supporting many different kind of alternative economy models. After all, they have realized, that if they publish (others) intellectual properties for the public, they have to rely on similar exchanges in many other filed of economy.

But let’s take a quick overview on the notion of gifting in this culture: and especially the aspect of warez , the distribution of stolen, (pirated) movies and software applications.

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Xenia – the act of gifting by peterfuchs
September 18, 2008, 4:07 pm
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Hospitality of Abraham by Andrei Rublev

Hospitality of Abraham by Andrei Rublev

The custom of “friendship hospitality”, Xenia – generous treatment of strangers, wanderers, dates back to the Ancient Greek times. Zeus Xenios, Wandering Zeus was the patron gods of travelers, who could expect to find a bowl of warm soup and a bed anywhere in the Ancient Greek lands. A violation of Xenia led to the outbreak

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Rai Stones by peterfuchs
September 18, 2008, 12:26 pm
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Rai Stone carried by the indigenous Yap people

Rai Stone carried by the indigenous Yap people

Rai Stones are a special form of currency, which acts as symbolic item in exchanges on the Micronesian island of Yap. It does resembles a large stone coin, craved out of limestone, has an average width of 1 meter  and weights up to 4 tonnes.The stones value is changing according to its history, where was it transported, and if anyone died during its transport.

Rai stones were used in social transactions such as marriage, inheritance, political deals, sign of an alliance, ransom of the battle dead or just in exchange for food. Many of them are placed in front of meetinghouses or specific pathways. Though the ownership of a particular stone changes, the stone itself is rarely moved. The names of previous owners are passed down to the new one. (via Wikiepdia)

Further information on the rai stones, and their useage on the wikipedia. I would higlight the fact that the colonial Japanese forces used them as anchors as they found no value in these items.

(image is by Rudy)



Stone Soup by peterfuchs
September 13, 2008, 10:04 am
Filed under: Art as Gift Research blog | Tags:
Brothers Grimm

The Brothers Grimm

Stone Soup is a fable collected by the Brothers Grimm – and found in many diffrent versions all across Europe – about the benefits of cooperation and selflessness.

According to the story, some travelers come to a village, carrying nothing more than an empty pot. Upon their arrival, the villagers are unwilling to share any of their food stores with the hungry travelers. The travelers fill the pot with water, drop a large stone in it, and place it over a fire in the village square. One of the villagers becomes curious and asks what they are doing. The travelers answer that they are making “stone soup”, which tastes wonderful, although it still needs a little bit of garnish to improve the flavor, which they are missing. The villager doesn’t mind parting with just a little bit to help them out, so it gets added to the soup. Another villager walks by, inquiring about the pot, and the travelers again mention their stone soup which hasn’t reached its full potential yet. The villager hands them a little bit of seasoning to help them out. More and more villagers walk by, each adding another ingredient. Finally, a delicious and nourishing pot of soup is enjoyed by all. (via Wikipedia)

Nowadays, a large number of collaborative, non-profit project embark this very title – in some extent, the allegory of the stone soup functions as a model for a new, peer based economy, in which a large amount of “free”, or “gift” work brings a valuable final product.

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Burning Man by peterfuchs
September 11, 2008, 6:59 am
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Burning Man

Burning Man by Aaron Logan, source: http://www.lightmatter.net/gallery/albums.php

For more than two decades, on every Labor Day tens of thousands of participants gather at the temporary city of  Black Rock City, Nevada, to build a huge, 12 meter high wooden effigy and finally set it on fire.

One of the basic organizing principle of the event, which attracted almost fifty thousand visitor this year (2008), is the lack of monetary transfer: gift economy. Only then the tickets to the city itself, and the basic needs like drinks, water and ice can be exchanged by using cash, any other transaction should be used by the means of gift economy.

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